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poster Dan Cohen
Open Mind Film Screening
Alive Inside

Alive Inside is a stirring documentary that follows numerous visionaries in healthcare including social worker Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music & Memory, as he fights against a broken healthcare system to demonstrate music’s ability to combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of self to those suffering from Alzheimer's and Dementia and other neurodegenerative illnesses. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music. His camera reveals the uniquely human connection we find in music and its healing power.

Dr. David Reuben, Director of the UCLA Multicampus Program in Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology and the founder of the Alzheimer’s and Dementia Comprehensive Healthcare Program at UCLA, will join Dan Cohen in discussion following the screening.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016
6:30PM Check-in   7:00 PM Program
Melnitz Hall, UCLA (see map)
Admission is free but reservations are required.

For questions call 310-825-3119 or WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu
Parking is available for $12 in Structure 3 (see map)

 
How to Dance
Open Mind Film Screening
How to Dance in Ohio

In How to Dance in Ohio, we get to know three girls with an array of developmental challenges as they prepare for an iconic event - a spring formal dance.  They spend 12 weeks confronting and practicing their social skills as they prepare for the big event.  Working with their trusted psychologist, they deconstruct fear and larger-than-life social anxiety,  one step at a time,  by picking dates, dresses, and, ultimately, a King and Queen of the Prom. How to Dance in Ohio is a story of the universal human need to grow, connect and belong as uniquely dramatized by individuals facing the deepest struggle toward social survival. Through their stories, and a chorus of other young women and men confronting similar issues, these girls reveal the hard work, perseverance and resilience it takes to be a part of contemporary society, along with the extraordinary challenges of being different. Entertaining, funny and heartbreaking, How to Dance in Ohio challenges us to question and celebrate the path to human connection and to rethink the definition of normal.

Director Alexandra Shiva will join Dr. Elizabeth Laugeson, Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the Semel Institute, Director of UCLA’s Help Group Autism Research Alliance, and the Founder and Director of PEERS, an outpatient program providing parent-assisted social skills training for adolescents and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders.  

Monday, October 17, 2016
6:30PM Check-in   7:00 PM Program
Melnitz Hall, UCLA (see map)
Admission is free but reservations are required.

For questions call 310-825-3119 or WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu
Parking is available for $12 in Structure 3 (see map)

 
Dr. Mayer
Open Mind Lecture
The Mind Gut Connection with Dr. Emeran Mayer

Combining cutting-edge neuroscience with the latest discoveries on the human microbiome, a practical guide in the tradition of The Second Brain, and The Good Gut that conclusively demonstrates the inextricable, biological link between mind and the digestive system. We have all experienced the connection between our mind and our gut—the decision we made because it “felt right”; the butterflies in our stomach before a big meeting; the anxious stomach rumbling we get when we’re stressed out. While the dialogue between the gut and the brain has been recognized by ancient healing traditions, including Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine, Western medicine has by and large failed to appreciate the complexity of how the brain, gut, and more recently, the gut microbiota—the microorganisms that live inside our digestive tract—communicate with one another. In The Mind-Gut Connection, Dr. Emeran Mayer, professor of medicine and executive director of the UCLA Center for Neurobiology of Stress, offers a revolutionary and provocative look at this developing science, teaching us how to harness the power of the mind-gut connection to take charge of our health and listen to the innate wisdom of our bodies.

November 14, 2016
6:30PM Check-in   7:00 PM Program
Tampkin Auditorium, UCLA (see map)
Admission is free but reservations are required.

For questions call 310-825-3119 or WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu
Parking is available for $12 in Structure 8 (see map)

 
Kevin Hines
Open Mind Lecture
Cracked Not Broken, The Kevin Hines Story

Kevin Hines is a global speaker, best-selling author and mental health advocate who reaches audiences with his story of an unlikely survival and his strong will to live. Two years after he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder (at 19 years of age), he attempted to take his own life by jumping from the Golden Gate Bridge. He is one of only 34 people (less than one percent) to survive the fall. Kevin shares how he traveled to the Bridge, his feelings of helplessness yet desire for someone to help, his interactions with others that day and the impact you can have to change a life.

In 2013, Kevin released his memoir titled, Cracked Not Broken, The Kevin Hines Story. It is on several bestsellers lists and his story inspired a film called "The Bridge".

Kevin believes in the power of the human spirit and that everyone can live mentally well.  His will to live and stay mentally well has inspired millions worldwide.                       

Tuesday, December 13, 2016
6:30PM Check-in   7:00 PM Program
Melnitz Hall, UCLA (see map)
Admission is free but reservations are required.

For questions call 310-825-3119 or WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu
Parking is available for $12 in Structure 3 (see map)

 
Nanci Chritopher Gloria Ellen Neidorf
Open Mind Event
One Minute of Happiness

One Minute of Happiness is a tale of sisterhood and baking, written and performed by Nanci Christopher. This one-person play is a poignant, tragic, and often humorous account of Ms. Christopher’s relationship with her severely bipolar sister, Gloria. Each story flows naturally into the next as Nanci and her family try to survive the upheaval and holocaust of Gloria’s madness as it rips apart any semblance of normal family life. It is also a story of redemption and healing through the sisters’ attempt to stay connected via their shared passion for baking. From disorder to order, from chaos and mess to delicious nurturing, from confusion and anger to acceptance and love, this recipe for recovery is an honest and authentic look at mental illness from the inside out.

Nanci Christopher is an actress and playwright. She performed her last solo show, And Baby Makes Two – an adoption tale at the Santa Monica Playhouse - for over three months. It was nominated for the prestigious Susan Smith Blackburn Prize and published by Samuel French. She has also been an invited guest at the Humana Festival at The Actors Theatre of Louisville and the O’Neill National Playwrights’ Conference in Connecticut. She is currently an Associate Member of Pacific Resident Theatre in Venice.

In Loving Memory and Honor of Gloria Ellen Neidorf

Monday, January 16, 2017
6:30PM Check-in   7:00 PM Program
Tamkin Auditorium, UCLA (see map)
Admission is free but reservations are required.

For questions call 310-825-3119 or WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu
Parking is available for $12 in Structure 8 (see map)